Thoughts Sermon Illustrations

Thoughts Sermon Illustrations

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Did you ever have a brain throb when a man of greatness uttered a noble and creative thought? According to Genevieve Knudtson in Farmer's Wife, May, 1961, "Each of us has a touch of genius. Great thoughts and profound ideas wend across our minds like clouds across a summer sky."

Whereas most of us experience the flash of new and original thoughts without follow-up meditation, great minds nurture and polish these thought flashes.

Says Mrs. Knudtson, "Thank God for men like Frost, Aristotle, Franklin and Thoreau who have redeemed our thoughts from mediocrity and made them immortal."


According to a Pennsylvania State University researcher, the average person speaks at the rate of 125 to 160 words a minute, but thinks four times faster than he speaks. This department knows plenty of people who can speak that fast without thinking at all.—Counselor


No lions are ever caught in mouse traps. To catch lions you must think in terms of lions, not in terms of mice. Your mind is always creating traps of one kind or another and what you catch depends on the thinking you do. It is your thinking that attracts you to what you receive.—Thomas Drier, industrial editor


'Tis much easier to learn and remember than it is to think and investigate.—Thomas Gregory


The natural tendency among the majority of people is to think by proxy; we lean upon others, or we follow in their footsteps.—T. Sharper Knowlson


All the great thinkers have been masters of metaphor because all vivid thinking must be in images and the philosopher whose metaphors are blurred and diluted is one whose thinking is blurred and diluted.—T. Sharper Knowlson


Joe: "Why does the average girl prefer beauty to brains?"
Flo: "Because the men who can see outnumber the men who can think."


If you persisted in going to sea in a leaky boat, you'd know you had no excuse to offer when the boat sank under you. Yet you go about with leaks in your consciousness through which you allow negative thoughts to enter, warns Don Spencer in Thought Starters. Your consciousness must be sealed against such evil apparitions as selfishness, thoughtlessness, jealousy, pride, vindictiveness, anger, and the like, just as your boat must be sealed against the water on the outside. It is never the water in the ocean that sinks ships. It is the water that gets in where it has no business to be.


The main reason that some of us get lost in thought is that it is such unfamiliar territory.


It has been said, 'We are not what we think we are, but—what we think, we are.'

A naughty little weed one day
Poked up its tiny head.
`Tomorrow I will pull you up,
Old Mr. Weed,' I said.
But I put off the doing till,
When next I passed that way,
The hateful thing had spread abroad
And laughed at my dismay.

A naughty little thought one day
Popped right into my mind.
`Oh no!' I cried, 'I'll put you out
Tomorrow, you will find!'
But once again I put it off,
Till like the little weed,
The ugly thing sprang up apace
And grew into a deed.

(Rom. 12. 2; Phil. 4. 8)


Sow a thought, you reap an action; sow an action, you reap a habit: sow a habit, you reap a character: sow a character, you reap a destiny.

(Prov. 12. 5; Ps. 19. 14; 2 Cor. 10. 5)


A young man went up from his home in the country to the city to take his degree in the University there. As a resident student, he had his own room in the hostel. After he had settled in, his mother, a godly, devoted Christian, decided to pay him a visit. She found that he was comfortably ensconced, and was taking an interest in the various courses of study to prepare him for his degree: but she was very shocked to see the kind of pictures he had fixed to the walls of his room in the hostel. They were portraits of semi-dressed artistes, film stars, and suggested much that was sensual, and unbecoming a young man who had been reared and trained at home as he had. The mother said not a word.

Instead of expressing her displeasure, she went home, had her photo taken, and sent him the very best that the photographer could provide, with the request that he would hang it in his room. The next time she visited him, all the other pictures were gone: only his mother's photograph adorned the wall. When she asked him about it, he replied, 'You see, mother, I could not have those pictures along­side of yours. They would be out of place.'

(Rom. 8. 6; Phil. 4. 8; Col. 3. 1, 2)


He trudg'd along unknowing what he sought,
And whistled as he went, for want of thought.—Dryden

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