Success Sermon Illustrations

Success Sermon Illustrations

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If you wish to gain success, do not stare up the steps—step on the stairs.—Friendly Chat


Success is the fine art of making mistakes when nobody is looking.


The Father of Shakespeare was a wool merchant.
The Emperor Diocletian was the son of a slave.
Abraham Lincoln's father was a poor farmer and laborer.
Cardinal Antonelli's father was an Italian bandit.
The father of Adrian, the ascetic pontiff, was a beggar.
Virgil's father was a porter and for years a slave.
Demosthenes' father, a blacksmith and swordmaker.
Ben Franklin was the son of a soapboiler.
Daniel Webster was the son of a poor farmer.
Christopher Columbus was the son of a weaver.
Sophocles, the Greek poet, was the son of a blacksmith.—Sunshine Magazine


Conspicuous successes are comparatively few because most people think of success as acquired; it is more correctly contributed.

People who try to break in by the gate of acquisition are knocking at the wrong door. The entrance to success is by the gate of contribution. Everything that is taken out, someone has put in. How much have you put in?—Friendly Chat


Young man, if you're going to keep ahead of the cost of living these days you've got to find the secret of perpetual promotion.—Oren Arnold, Kiwanis Magazine


The secret of success: Never let down! Never let up!—T. Harry Thompson, Sales Management


Success is full of promise till you get it; and then it is a last year's nest from which the bird has flown.—Henry Ward Beecher, Lutheran Digest


The hard part of making good is that you have to do it again every day.—Survey Bulletin


The successful man was asked the secret of his accomplishments. His reply was:

"Good judgment."
"Where do you learn good judgment," he was asked.
"From experience."
"From where do you get experience?"
"From poor judgment."


In 1869 H. J. Heinz planted a small plot of horseradish. He and two women and a boy grated and bottled the root.

J. L. Kraft was a grocery clerk who started with a capital of 65 dollars to peddle cheese from a one-horse wagon.

Coca-Cola was first made in the kitchen of an old home adjoining Mr. Pemberton's Drug Store.

Charles W. Post made the first Postum in a barn.


Success is the ability to get along with some people, and ahead of others.


Nine ships in the fleet "Success" are: Sportsmanship, Citizenship, Leadership, Statesmanship, Ownership, Craftsmanship, Scholarship and Stewardship.


When the students of several nations voted on the greatest man in history, Louis Pasteur headed the list. The four outstanding qualities of this "greatest man in history," according to a psychologist, were: enthusiasm, courage, work, and ability to learn from his mistakes.


A man must win general success to get the word "private" on his office door.


If you are set on making good somewhere, why not make good where you are?—Try Square


If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way.—Author Unknown


Webster's dictionary says a "prodder" is "that which incites, as to activity." A prodder may appear in many forms—a set of circumstances, or a particular person—and often we are not aware of the prodding. Many successes in the world can be traced to a "prodder," somewhere along the line.


The persistent exercise of a little extra effort is one of the most powerful forces contributing to success.—American Mercury


Never you mind the crowd, lad,
Or fancy your life won't tell;
There's always work for a' that
To him that doeth it well.
Fancy the world a hill, lad,
Look where the millions stop;
You'll find the crowd at the base, lad—
There's always room at the top.—Success Nuggets


Flash powder makes a more brilliant light than the arc lamp, but you can't use it to light your street corner because it doesn't last long enough. Stability is more essential to success than brilliancy.—Richard Lloyd Jones, American newspaper editor Tulsa, Oklahoma


It takes a little courage and a little self-control
And some grim determination, if you want to reach the goal.
It takes a deal of striving and a firm and stern-set chin,
No matter what the battle, if you really want to win.
There's no easy path to glory; there's no rosy road to fame.
Life, however we may view it, is no simple parlor game.
You must take a blow or give one; you must risk and you must lose
And expect that in the struggle you will suffer from the bruise.
But you mustn't wince or falter, if a fight you once begin
Be a man and face the battle—that's the only way to win.—Anonymous

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