Soul Sermon Illustrations

Soul Sermon Illustrations

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There is nothing sadder than a wreck. The wreck of a house where the sacraments of birth and marriage and death have been celebrated. The wreck of a great ship lying on reef or in the sand with the waves breaking over it, the very symbol of frustration. The wreck of a great building, such as an ancient temple where the gods were once worshiped, or a palace where kings and queens ruled and rioted, but now nothing but a heap of rubbish where the lizards dart and the wild beast makes his lair. The wreck of a great city. To those who knew and loved London, nothing could be more distressing than to see great sections of the ancient city and buildings, which seemed to be the incarnation of the long story of English history, now blasted and gutted with fire and reduced to heaps of stones. But saddest of all is the ruin of a human soul. All the ships on the seven seas might be sunk, all the beautiful buildings of the world reduced to rubbish, all the great cities of the world bombed and blasted, but that could not compare with the ruin of a single soul made in the image of God.


There is nothing more stirring than to see a great airliner in flight through the heavens, its engines roaring and its silver body silhouetted against the blue empyrean. It strikes the observer as a symbol of man's mastery of the forces of nature. Seen thus in its triumphant flight across the continent, the airship looks as if it would never come down. But they do, sometimes, come down; and they fall and crash, like the daystar falling out of the heavens. What a fall it is! What a scene is a wreck! Trees snapped off, fields plowed up, fragments of the fusilage and the cabin, and the great wings, and the wheels and the rudder, and the engine, strewn over an acre of ground.

The fall of the airplane is a symbol of the conquest of man by nature; transferred to the spiritual and moral world, it is a symbol of the wreck and ruin of a soul. There is no fall like that. Remember it was not a house that Christ was talking about, but the soul of a man, when, at the conclusion of the world's greatest sermon, the Sermon on the Mount, he said, "And it fell: and great was the fall of it" (Matt. 7:27).


Almost a century ago a man, Caspar Hawser, appeared in the streets of Nuremburg, Germany. He was then a man in middle life, but for the first time he had seen the blue sky and the face of man and heard the sound of the human voice. Since earliest childhood he had been shut in the dark dungeon, never permitted to speak with a fellow being or to look into another face or to behold the sun in the heavens. Now in middle life, with a tongue untrained to speak and a mind untrained to think, he was thrust out into a world for whose life and duties he was altogether unfitted. A distinguished lawyer in Germany wrote a history of this tragic case, which he appropriately entitled, "A Crime Against the Life of the Soul," for such, indeed, it was. Yet there is a crime against the soul of which multitudes are guilty in this world. The soul has an eye that would see God; it has an ear which would hear His voice; it has the possibility and power of reverence, faith, and love. Yet multitudes of men shut their souls down in the dungeon of sensuality and sin.


That mysterious thing,
Which hath no limit from the walls of sense,
No chill from hoary time, with pale decay
No fellowship, but shall stand forth unchanged,
Unscorched amid the resurrection fires,
To bear its boundless lot of good or ill.—Mrs. L. H. Sigourney


Two lives there are in man—one of the body, another of the soul. As the life of the body is the soul, so the life of the soul is God. In like manner, if the soul forsake the body, the body dieth; so the soul dieth if God forsake it. But this is His grace—He resuscitates the soul that He may be ever with it.—Augustine


A little boy on his father's knee said, "Pa is your soul insured?" "Why do you ask, my son?" "I heard Uncle George say, that you had your house insured, and your life insured; but he did not believe you had thought of your soul, and he was afraid you would lose it. Won't you get it insured right away?" It was all too true; and the question led the father to seek the divine guaranty of his soul's well-being.—Selected

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