School Administration Sermon Illustrations

School Administration Sermon Illustrations

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Curiously it's the hard job not done that tires us out more than the difficult task over and done with. The housewife taking mental inventory of the day's chores will sometimes slump into an armchair more exhausted than if she had just completed a grueling day. The writer gazes vacantly at the blank page in his typewriter, sighing so heavily you would think he had just finished a novel. And often the mere sight of the morning mail, memoranda, and stack of reports, will paralyze the executive into virtual immobility.

Why is this so? One school administrator, taking stock of the many problems looming ahead for schoolmen, supplies an answer. Says Clara E. Cockerville, Assistant Superintendent, Armstrong County, Kittaning, Pennsylvania: "It's what Dorothy Canfield Fisher calls 'anticipatory fatigue.' We look at the gigantic task and as we think of all that must be done we are tired before we begin. This is a dangerous tiredness; to give in to it, to say all this talk about school changes will pass, to stand still, to do nothing is to be a traitor to the position we occupy—that of educational leader of a community. One of the best antidotes to anticipatory fatigue comes from an ancient sage. Said Confucius: 'He who walks a thousand miles must take the first step."—Educator's Dispatch


The handwriting isn't on the wall any more. The superintendent has had his back to the wall for so long that the handwriting is on his back.


One of the topics for discussion at a state school adminis-trator's workshop at the University of Illinois was "The Role of the Superintendent in School Plant Planning?' I had written this topic along with four others on the blackboard at the opening session.

On the second morning of the workshop one of the participants called my attention to an apparent misspelled word. Now the topic reads, "The Roll of the Superintendent in School Plant Planning." Someone with a sense of humor plus experience in school building problems had changed one letter and the group agreed that perhaps the word "roll" was more appropriate.—M. Dale Baughman


Above all run a functional office. Know the definition of functional. It looks like H—— but it's handy.


In baseball the shortstop who gets one "too hot to handle" is not credited with an error but the school administrator who can't handle the hot ones is always credited with errors.—M. Dale Baughman


When placement offices failed to help Homer Schroughams, he put an ad in the paper which read, "Exhausted, bored, frustrated superintendent resigning from present position. Incompetent, thinks too little and talks too much, seeks new position, not too much work. Age 50, looks 65." He was swamped with offers.

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