Nature Sermon Illustrations

Nature Sermon Illustrations

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God's Beauty Amid Man's Wreckage

With a lavish hand the divine Artist still decks earth and sky and sea in gorgeous colors. In keeping with His promise to Noah, He has sent another spring­time and summer to this troubled world. Knowing our frame, He provides relief from the sad scenes and thoughts of war. A letter received a year ago from a little land that has been devasted by war for the second time in our generation contains a triumphant note of true Christian thankfulness. "Some of the small parks of Brussels," wrote Dr. Vansteenberghe, co-director of the Belgian Gospel Mission, "are ravishing at this time with their trees in bloom. In spite of the carnage that goes on around us the work of God in nature continues. We had much encouragement in that. I love to look at the little flowers which cast a note of joy into the grass plots and the parks. They bloom, spreading their beauty without care for the evil times that we are now experiencing. I ask for myself that grace of being able to spread abroad the sweet savor of Christ with­out being troubled by events."—Sunday School Times.


In his life of David Hume, Huxley has an eloquent passage in which he describes Hume's tomb on the eastern slope of Calton Hill, looking down on Edinburgh, where, he says, "one may meditate undisturbed upon the epitome of nature and man, the kingdoms of this world spread out before him." "Surely," he continues, "there is a fitness in the choice of this last resting place by the philosopher and historian who saw so clearly that these two kingdoms form but one realm, governed by uniform laws and alike based on impenetrable darkness and eternal silence."

We reject both Huxley's and Hume's conception of the universe, but there is something in what Huxley says about the silence of the natural world as to God. Perhaps the best that we can do, as far as God and the natural world are concerned, is to say, with always deep, original, and helpful Pascal, that "the world only gives indication of the presence of a God who conceals Himself."


"What do you see" was asked of the famous botanist, who was scrutinizing a flower. "I see God," was the reverent answer.—Selected


Pupil, genuine wisdom learn.
Yonder see that bush of roses:
How before thee it doth burn,
Like the burning bush of Moses!
'Harken, and thou shalt hear,
If thy soul's not deaf or flighty,
How from out it, soft and clear,
Speaks to thee the Lord Almighty!—W. R. Alger


A minister asked an aged Negro his reason for believing in the existence of a God. "Sir," said he, "I have been here going hard upon fifty years. Every day since I have been in this world, I see the sun rise in the east and set in the west. The north stars stands where it did the first time I ever saw it; the seven stars and Job's coffin keep on the same path in the sky, and never turn out. It ain't so with man's works. He makes clocks and watches: they may run well for a while; but they get out of fix, and stand still. But the sun and moon and stars keep on the same way all the while. There is a Power which makes one man die, and another get well; that sends the rain, and keeps everything in motion."—Selected


"How do you know there is a God?" said a scoffer to an Arab guide who was rising from his morning prayer. "How did I know a camel passed my tent in the darkness but by the print of his hoof?" was the reply. "So," said he, pointing to the sunset, "I know that yonder footprint is not man's, but God's."—Selected

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