Hypocrisy Sermon Illustrations

Hypocrisy Sermon Illustrations

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Rusting at Anchor

A man while touring near Alexandria noticed two Turkish warships lying at anchor, and proceeded to take a picture of them. The captain of the vessel on which the tourist was traveling noticed his interest in the warships and said to him with a smile, "Yes, they look formidable enough, but they are perfectly harmless. They were anchored there eight years ago, and haven't turned a wheel since." Christians sometimes sing that glorious old hymn, "I've Anchored in Jesus." Is it not possible to be safe and yet never turn a wheel for Him?Sunday School Times.


As Good as Others Think You Are

It is related of Saint Francis of Assisi that he one day met a peasant who asked him, "Art thou Francis?" And Francis acknowledged his name, it may have been with something of pride; for it was a name far-famed for piety and good deeds. But the peasant uttered this warning:

"Take heed that thou be as good as men believe thee."

It was a startling admonition, and might have seemed superfluous, for Francis was a saint, and he who warned him a peasant. But Francis was good enough and sensible enough to know that a wise word had been spoken, and he took the warning to his heart.

It would be well for every man reputed to be good if someone should thus admonish him. He to whom men look up has great need of humility. For if he fall, many will be caused to stumble by his fall.The Youth's Evangelist.


Strange Fire

A Los Angeles Jewish newspaper says: At a district meeting of Sisterhoods recently held, one of the speakers, a rabbi's wife, rose to "do her stuff." While on her feet, and before launching forth on her message, she took a long puff of the cigarette between her lips, inhaled the smoke, blew it through her nose, dipped the burning end of the delicate and dainty weed in what of coffee remained in the demitasse, and lifting her eyes and voice on high, said: "The first and most important duty of a Sisterhood is to deepen the religious life of the congregation. The Sisterhood must be chiefly concerned with the spiritual side of the congregation's life." Sisterhoods, spirituality, and cigarettes are a strange combination. I can't imagine Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, Leah, Hannah, Deborah, smoking cigarettes le shame shoma yim ("to the glory of God") . Cigarattes and spirituality suggest to me the sons of Aaron bringing strange fire to the altar of God.—Israel's Advocate.


Highest and Lowest

Ananias wished to have the credit of a complete sacrifice, and yet kept back part of it for himself—"professing cream and practicing skim milk," as someone has said. The Register and Leader of Des Moines contains this item: "Wu Ting Fang, when he came to leave America, observed in his shrewd Chinese way that Americans profess higher ideals and fall farther short of realizing them than any other people in the world."—Selected.


Bats and Swallows

A traveler in Borneo tells of finding there a great cave which was occupied in the day-time by the bats, and at night by the swallows. As he watched the mouth of the cave about sunset, the first column of bats appeared, and wheeled away down the valley in a long coil, winding over the treetops in a wonderfully close and regular order. These were followed in less than a minute's time by another column, and in forty minutes, forty-seven distinct columns were counted, each about six hundred feet long by ten feet thick. It was estimated that over half a million bats flew out of the cave in less than three-quarters of an hour. As the last bats flew away, the swallows appeared in enormous numbers and for a long time there was a ceaseless whirr of wings. Soon after dawn the next morning, the bats returned, and literally rained into the cave, while the swallows passed out in a counter current. Some people try to live a double life like that. To the outer world, they try to make it appear that they are as innocent as swallows, while underneath the bats hold revel.—Louis Albert Banks.


And sold, and lied; and salutations made
In scripture terms.  He pray'd by quantity,
And with his repetitions, long and loud,
All knees were weary.—Pollok


Hypocrisy is all right if we can pass it off as politeness.


TEACHER-"Now, Tommy, what is a hypocrite?"

TOMMY-"A boy that comes to school with a smile on his face."—Graham Charteris.

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