Giving Sermon Illustrations

Giving Sermon Illustrations

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What He Left

In a little village lived a lawyer famous for drawing up wills, in which branch of his profession he had long enjoyed a monopoly of the business of the country. On the death of a certain respected neighbor there was much speculation as to the value of the property, and the village gossip undertook to find out the facts. "I suppose you made Blank's will?" he said bluntly to the lawyer. "Yes," the lawyer answered. "Then you probably know how much he left. Would you mind telling me?" "Not at all," answered the lawyer deliberately. "He left everything he had."—Forward.


His Willing Gift

M. Lockert (of the McAll Mission) preached on a January evening on "Such as I have I give thee" (Acts 3:6). The audience of Parisian poor had nothing to give,—rather were they in need of everything. When the meeting was over all but one went home. This was a poor man who came forward to ask what he could give. He had nothing, absolutely nothing, except a card for a night's lodging. But this he surrendered to an older man, even poorer than himself, who was shivering on the steps of a church. Then he led him to his lodging house where he would be warm for the night while he himself went out into the snow.—Sunday School Times.


The Leper's Liberality

The Rev. Mr. Jones, of the Madur Mission, India, tells a story worthy to be placed alongside of that of the immortal widow. It was a time when the converts of the Mission were bringing gifts for the erection of a church building. Among them was a leper. Clad only in a rag of a loin cloth, his body emaciated from the lack of food, he brought an offering of one and one-half cents. To him it meant privation and hunger to lay that cent and a half upon the altar. But it lay there with the crimson touch of sacrifice upon it, not one and a half cents in the eyes of the Master of the Treasury, but riches of liberality. —The Evangelical Christian.


The Lord's Own Precedent

A group of churches was raising a fund of $30,000 to finance missionary projects in Africa and South America. A little church whose members lost nearly all their property in a terrible dam disaster sent a check for $209. The secretary of the missionary society sponsoring the work was reproached for accepting the gift: "Doesn't it hurt your conscience to take money from people so `hard up'?" The secretary replied, "Did the Lord tell the widow to come back and take her two mites out of the treasury box?"—Sunday School Times.


Giving

Little girl told an older friend that she was going to give her papa a pair of slippers for his birthday. "Where will you get your money?" asked the friend. She opened her eyes wide and said, "Why, Father will give me the money." For a moment the friend was silent as he thought that the father would buy his own birthday present. And the father loved the little girl and appreciated the gift, even though he paid for it himself. We have nothing of our own to give to God.—Selected.


Are You Excused?

Horace Bushnell, the great new England preacher, once made an interesting list of those who might be excused from giving to God's work and for the support of Christian missions. Here it is:

They only may claim to be excused—
Who believe that men are not lost in sin and do not need a Saviour.

Who believe that Jesus made a mistake when He said to His followers: "Go into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature."

Who believe the Gospel is not the power of God, and that faith in Christ cannot save.

Who wish that missionaries had never come to our ancestors, and that we ourselves are still heathen.

Who believe that it is "every man for himself" in this world, and, with Cain, ask: "Am I my brother's keeper?"

Who wish to have no share in the final victory of Christ.

Who believe they are not accountable to God for the money and talents entrusted to them.

Who are prepared to accept the final judgment of Christ: "Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to Me."

Do you belong to the Mission or the Omission Band?—Truth.


What He Left

In a little village lived a lawyer famous for drawing up wills, in which branch of his profession he had long enjoyed a monopoly of the business of the country. On the death of a certain respected neighbor there was much speculation as to the value of the property, and the village gossip undertook to find out the facts. "I suppose you made Blank's will?" he said bluntly to the lawyer. "Yes," the lawyer answered. "Then you probably know how much he left. Would you mind telling me?" "Not at all," answered the lawyer deliberately. "He left everything he had."—Forward.


His Willing Gift

M. Lockert (of the McAll Mission) preached on a January evening on "Such as I have I give thee" (Acts 3:6). The audience of Parisian poor had nothing to give,—rather were they in need of everything. When the meeting was over all but one went home. This was a poor man who came forward to ask what he could give. He had nothing, absolutely nothing, except a card for a night's lodging. But this he surrendered to an older man, even poorer than himself, who was shivering on the steps of a church. Then he led him to his lodging house where he would be warm for the night while he himself went out into the snow.—Sunday School Times.


The Leper's Liberality

The Rev. Mr. Jones, of the Madur Mission, India, tells a story worthy to be placed alongside of that of the immortal widow. It was a time when the converts of the Mission were bringing gifts for the erection of a church building. Among them was a leper. Clad only in a rag of a loin cloth, his body emaciated from the lack of food, he brought an offering of one and one-half cents. To him it meant privation and hunger to lay that cent and a half upon the altar. But it lay there with the crimson touch of sacrifice upon it, not one and a half cents in the eyes of the Master of the Treasury, but riches of liberality. —The Evangelical Christian.


The Lord's Own Precedent

A group of churches was raising a fund of $30,000 to finance missionary projects in Africa and South America. A little church whose members lost nearly all their property in a terrible dam disaster sent a check for $209. The secretary of the missionary society sponsoring the work was reproached for accepting the gift: "Doesn't it hurt your conscience to take money from people so `hard up'?" The secretary replied, "Did the Lord tell the widow to come back and take her two mites out of the treasury box?"—Sunday School Times.


Giving

Little girl told an older friend that she was going to give her papa a pair of slippers for his birthday. "Where will you get your money?" asked the friend. She opened her eyes wide and said, "Why, Father will give me the money." For a moment the friend was silent as he thought that the father would buy his own birthday present. And the father loved the little girl and appreciated the gift, even though he paid for it himself. We have nothing of our own to give to God.—Selected.


Are You Excused?

Horace Bushnell, the great new England preacher, once made an interesting list of those who might be excused from giving to God's work and for the support of Christian missions. Here it is:

They only may claim to be excused—
Who believe that men are not lost in sin and do not need a Saviour.

Who believe that Jesus made a mistake when He said to His followers: "Go into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature."

Who believe the Gospel is not the power of God, and that faith in Christ cannot save.

Who wish that missionaries had never come to our ancestors, and that we ourselves are still heathen.

Who believe that it is "every man for himself" in this world, and, with Cain, ask: "Am I my brother's keeper?"

Who wish to have no share in the final victory of Christ.

Who believe they are not accountable to God for the money and talents entrusted to them.

Who are prepared to accept the final judgment of Christ: "Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to Me."

Do you belong to the Mission or the Omission Band?—Truth.


"Honor the Lord With Thy Substance"

Someone tells the story of a boy who was away from home, partly working his way through the school he attended, and who received a letter in which his father stated that the crops had been so disappointing that even the help he had been able to give him heretofore must now be withdrawn.

"I regret it very much," the father said; "but I think you will have to drop out of school. Come home and work on the farm."

The boy had only a quarter left in his pocket, and he knew that in order to get home he would have to walk most of the way, stopping at one or another place where he was known, for breakfast and supper or for a night's lodging. He lived in a part of the country where the latch-string is loose for boys who are poor and ambitious, and he had no fear as to how he should reach home. To give up his studies was a great hardship, and he could not bear to think of all the time he might have to lose before he could return to the beloved recitation rooms. The father's letter came on Saturday.

On Sunday morning the boy went to church and a collection was taken up for foreign missions. When the contribution box came around, the boy's silver quarter was dropped into it, although giving it up left him penniless. "Honor the Lord with thy substance" floated into his memory, and he obeyed the command.

The next morning as his bag was packed and he was about to start on the road for home, another letter was put into his hand. It enclosed a gift from a stranger, and the amount was large enough to tide him over the remainder of the half year. God's promise had been fulfilled to him: "Them that honor Me I will honor."—The Christian.

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