Faith Sermon Illustrations

Faith Sermon Illustrations

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We Don't Need Crucifixes

They tell the story of a young soldier in Italy who jumped into a fox hole just the seat-of-his-pants ahead of a bullet. Crouching and digging in a bit better, his hand touched metal, and he brought up a silver crucifix, left no doubt, by a former occupant. A moment later another leaping figure landed beside him as the shells screamed. When the soldier got a chance to look, he saw that his companion was an army chaplain. Holding out the crucifix, the soldier gasped, "Am I glad to see you! How do you work this thing?" We smile at the naive ignorance of the soldier. But isn't it wonderful to know that we don't need crucifixes, nor do we need to know "how to work" them. All we need, whether in or out of fox holes, is a personal faith in the living Christ who once died on the cross for our sins, but who is now alive forevermore.—Christian Victory.


Simple Faith

In the spring of 1875, Hudson Taylor, the beloved founder of the China Inland Mission, was returning to London from Brighton, where he had been attending some meetings. Waiting for his train at the station, he was accosted by a Russian nobleman who had also attended the meetings, and who, on learning that Mr. Taylor was going to London, suggested that they should find seats together.

"But I am traveling third class," said the missionary.

"My ticket admits of my doing the same," was the courteous reply.

And they seem to have found a carriage alone together, for presently Count Bobrinsky took out his pocketbook with the words, "Allow me to give you a trifle toward your work in China."

Glancing at the bank note as he received it, Mr. Taylor felt there must be some mistake—it was no less than fifty pounds.

"Did you mean to give me five pounds?" Mr. Taylor asked at once. "Please let me return this note; it is for fifty pounds."

"I cannot take it back," replied the other, no less surprised. "It was five pounds I meant to give, but God must have intended you to have fifty pounds; I cannot take it back."

Impressed with the incident, Mr. Taylor reached Pyrland Road, the London home of the Mission, to find a prayer meeting going on. A remittance was about to be sent to China, and the money in hands was short by forty-nine pounds, eleven shillings, of the sum it was felt would be required. This deficiency was not accepted as inevitable. On the contrary, it called together those who knew of it for special prayer. Forty-nine pounds, eleven shillings, was being asked for in simple faith, and there upon the office table Mr. Taylor laid his precious bank note for fifty pounds. Could it have come more directly from the Heavenly Father's hand? "Whoso is wise, and will observe these things, even they shall understand the lovingkindness of the Lord."—Selected.


Is Sight the Real Test?

After listening to a Gospel address, an infidel asked permission to speak. Permission being given he spoke as follows: "Friends, I don't believe what this man has said; I don't believe in hell; I don't believe in a judgment; I don't believe in God; for I never saw one of them." When he sat down another man arose and said: "Friends, you say there is a river not far from this place. It is untrue. You tell me there are trees and grass growing round where I am standing. That also is not true. You say there are a great number of people standing here. Again I say that is not true. There is no one here save myself. I suppose you wonder what I am talking about, but I was born blind; I never saw one of you; and while I talk it only shows that I am blind, or I would not say such things. And you," he said, turning to the infidel, "the more you talk, the more you expose your ignorance, because you are spiritually blind. Pray that your eyes may be opened.Prophetic News.


What Don't You Believe?

The captain of the old ironclad Merrimac was skeptical concerning spiritual things. One day the chaplain of the Pennsylvania Soldiers' Home, where he was staying, gave him this challenge: "Read the Bible, and mark in red anything you don't believe. Begin with the Gospel of John." With a glitter in his eye the captain accepted the challenge. Whenever the chaplain would pass the room where the captain was confined because of illness, he would stop and say, "Captain, have you marked anything yet?" The old captain would only grin and remain silent. A number of days later the chaplain stepped into his room to find him dead upon his bed. His Bible was open, and the chaplain began looking through the Gospel of John for red marks. Nothing was marked in all the first chapter nor in all the second, nor in all the third until he came to the six­teenth verse. Beside this one he found these words, written in red, "I have cast my anchor in a safe harbor, thank God."Grace and Truth.


I Cannot Feel Saved

Martin Luther, in one of his conflicts with the devil, was asked by the arch­enemy if he felt his sins forgiven. "No," said the great Reformer, "I don't feel that they are forgiven, but I know they are, because God says so in His Word." Paul did not say, "Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt feel saved"; but, "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved."Scattered Seed.


Faith

There was once a good woman who was well-known among her circle for her simple faith and her great calmness in the midst of many trials. Another woman, living at a distance, hearing of her, said, "I must go and see that woman, and learn the secret of her calm, happy life." She went, and, accosting the woman, said, "Are you the woman with the great faith?" "No," was the answer, "I am not the woman with the great faith, but I am the woman with the little faith in the great God."—Sunday School Times.


Faith Alone

Dr. A. J. Gordon, while traveling on a train, engaged in a spirited conversation with a fellow passenger on the subject of "Faith." "I differ with you," said the man, "in that any person is admitted to Heaven because of a little bit of theological scrip called `Faith.' I believe that when God receives one into Heaven He makes a searching inquiry as to his character rather than inspection of his faith." Presently the conductor came along and examined the tickets. When he passed, Dr. Gordon said: "Did you ever notice how a conductor looks at the ticket and takes no pains to inspect the passenger? A railway ticket, if genuine, certifies that the person presenting it has complied with the company's conditions and is entitled to transportation. So `faith' alone, my friend, entitles one to that saving grace which produces a character well pleasing to God. 'Without faith it is impossible to please him.' "Alliance Weekly.

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