Cooperation Sermon Illustrations

Cooperation Sermon Illustrations

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My brother and his wife paid their sons for odd jobs. Increasingly the boys began to expect payment for everything they did. One Sunday morning their father found at his breakfast plate two bills which were as follows:

"Father owes Hepburn:
For sweeping the walks...................10
For practicing..................................35
For doing errands for Mom.............10
For brushing my teeth..................... 25
For C+ in arithmetic........................25
            Total                                1.05

I need a flash light. So long—Heppy."

"Father owes Walt:
For shining Dad's shoes.................. 15
For shining my shoes...................... 15
For eating carrots.......................... 25
For taking violin lesson...................50
For cleaning fingernails...................15
            Total                              1.20

I want a scout knife like Jack's.—Walt."

My brother and his wife said nothing. At supper next day the boys found their money carefully folded inside the bills with another paper which read: "Heppy and Walt owe Father and Mother:

For loving care and home..............0
For food and clothing....................0
For school, books and
music lessons................................0
For scout camps and toys.............0
For bicyles and movies.................0
              Total..............................0

We give because we love you. Mom and Dad".

Later, each boy asked for a "talk." Heppy and Walt understood for the first time the meaning of two words, — "Gratitude," and "Cooperation."—B. E. Smith


"A horse can't pull while kicking,
This fact I merely mention;
And he can't kick while pulling,
Which is my chief contention.

Let's imitate the good old horse
And lead a life that's fitting;
Just pull an honest load and then,
There'll be no time for kicking."


The Californian gets up at the alarm of a Connecticut clock, buttons his Chicago suspenders to his Detroit over-alls, washes his face with Ohio soap in a Pennsylvania pan, sits down to a Grand Rapids table, eats Kansas City meat and Minneapolis flour cooked with Indiana lard on a St. Louis stove, puts a New York bridle on a Colorado bronco, fed with Iowa corn, plows a five acre farm covered by an Illinois mortgage with a Chattanooga plow ; when bedtime comes he reads a chapter from a Bible printed in Boston, says a prayer written in Jerusalem, crawls under a blanket made in New Jersey, and gets up in the morning after having been kept awake all night by sand fleas—the home product of the state.

(P.S. This must have been written by someone from Arizona.)


"Said a wise old bee at the close of day:
'This colony business doesn't pay.
I put my honey in that old hive
That others may eat and live and thrive!
And I do more work in a day, maybe,
Than some of the others do in three;
I toil and worry and save and hoard,
And all I get is my room and board.
It's me for a hive I can run myself,
And me for the sweets of my hard-earn'd pelf.'

So the old bee flew to a meadow alone
And started business on her own.
She gave no thought to the buzzing clan,
But all intent on her selfish plan
She lived the life of a hermit free.
'Ah, this is great,' said the wise old bee.

But the summer waned and the days grew drear,
And the lone bee wailed and dropped a tear,
For the varmints had gobbled her little store
And her wax played out and her heart was sore,
So she winged her way to the old homeland,
And took her meals at a side-door stand.

Alone, our work is of little worth,
But together we are the lords of the earth;
So it's all for each and each for all—
United we stand, divided we fall."


In an address before the Washington Kiwanis Club, Homer Rodeheaver told the story of a Jew whose leg was crushed in an iron mine at Duluth. He was taken to a Catholic hospital, where he was operated upon by an Episcopalian surgeon and cared for by a Presbyterian nurse. It was necessary to amputate his leg. He advertised for a wooden leg in Dr. Barton's Congregational paper. A Methodist widow, whose husband had been a Baptist, took a wooden leg her husband had used out of storage and sent it by a Lutheran messenger to the Jew who, when he had learned the story, said, "I guess I am now a United Brethren."—The Lutheran


"All your strength is in your union; All your danger in discord; Therefore be at peace henceforward, And as brothers live together."—Henry W. Longfellow


His Hands and Feet

God said to me, "I am going to evangelize inland China, and if you will walk with me I will do it through you." Such is the statement of the experience of Hudson Taylor.—Association Men.


The Finger of God

Dr. H. C. Mason tells of the man who in prayer meeting prayed earnestly that God would with His finger touch a certain man. Suddenly he stopped his prayer. A brother asked him, "Why did you change your prayer?" He replied, "Because God said to me, `You are My finger.' So now I must go and touch the man for God."

Prayer for God's dealings with men is fundamental. If we do not wait upon Him before we go we shall be as the nine disciples who could not cast one demon out of the boy. But with the prayer must be our willingness to go at His bidding.

Some do not pray with a real care for those about who need God. Some pray but do not go. God would have us pray and go—The Free Methodist.

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