Contentment Sermon Illustrations

Contentment Sermon Illustrations

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An Allegory

A story is told of a king who went into his garden one morning, and found everything withered and dying. He asked an oak that stood near the gate what the trouble was. He found that it was sick of life and determined to die, because it was not tall and beautiful like the pine. The pine was out of heart because it could not bear grapes like the vine. The vine was going to throw its life away because it could not stand erect and have as fine fruit as the pomegranate.

And so on throughout the garden. Coming to a heartsease, the king found its bright face lifted up as full of cheerfulness as ever. Said the king: "Well, heartsease, I am glad to find one brave little flower in this general discouragement and dying. You don't seem one bit disheartened." "No, your majesty, I know I am of small account; but I concluded you wanted a heartsease when you planted me. If you had wanted an oak or a pine or a vine or a pomegranate, you would have set one out. So I am bound to be the best heartsease that ever I can."—Selected.


There's discontent from scepter to the swain,
And from the peasant to the king again.
Then whatsoever in thy will afflict thee,
Give it a welcome as a wholesome friend,
That would instruct thee to a better end.
Since no condition from defect is free,
Think not to find what here can never be.—A. Nicholas

(Luke 3. 14; 1 Tim. 6. 6; Heb. 13. 5)


A story is told of a king who went into his garden one morning and found everything withered and dying. He asked an oak that stood near the gate what the trouble was. He found it was sick of life and determined to die because it was not tall and beautiful like the pine. The pine was all out of heart because it could not bear grapes like the vine. The vine was going to throw its life away because it could not stand erect and have such fine fruit as the peach tree. The geranium was fretting because it was not tall and fragrant like the lilac; and so on all through the garden. Coming to a Heartsease, he found its bright face lifted as cheery as ever.

`Well, Heartsease, I'm glad amidst all the discouragements to find one brave little flower. You do not seem to be the least disheartened. `No, I am not of much account, but I thought that, if you wanted an oak or a pine or a peach tree, or a lilac, you would have planted one; but as I knew you wanted a Heartsease, I am determined to be the best little Heartsease that I can.' (1 Tim. 6. 6; 1 Pet. 5. 5; Phil. 4. 11)


Lord Congleton, coming downstairs one morning, in passing the kitchen door, heard the cook exclaim, `Oh, if I had only £5, wouldn't I be content?' Thinking the matter over, and anxious to see one woman at least satisfied, he shortly after handed her a £5 note. She thanked him profusely. As he was leaving, he paused outside the door to hear if she would express her satisfaction and contentment, and thank God.

As soon as his shadow was invisible, she cried out, 'Why didn't I say ten?' The human heart is like the horse-leach's daughters: it ever cries, 'More! more!'

(Prov. 30. 15; 1 Tim. 6. 8; Heb. 13. 5)


Give me, O Lord, Thy highest choice,
Let others take the rest;
Their good things have no charm for me,
For I have got Thy Best.—A. B. Simpson


A traveler seeing a lone shepherd asked him what weather it would be. "It will be," rimed the shepherd, "what weather pleases me." When asked for an explanation, he said, "Sir, it shall be whatever weather pleases God; and what weather pleases God pleases me." How much more content we would all be, if we were more conscious of the fact that all things are directed by our heavenly Father for our final good.—Selected

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