Christmas Sermon Illustrations

Christmas Sermon Illustrations

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What Shall I Give Him?

What shall I give Him, poor as I am?
If I were a shepherd, I would give a lamb;
If I were a wise man, I would do my part;
But such as I have I give Him,—
Give Him my heart.Selected.


Or Was This the Star?

The great astronomer Kepler discovered that in Christ's birth year there was an unusual occurrence among the planets. He found that in that year Jupiter and Saturn, which are generally in remote parts of the sky, came three times so near together that to the unassisted eye the rays of one were absorbed by the other, and their combination gave an extraordinary brilliant light, which continued for some months.—F. B. Meyer.


What is the thought of Christmas? Giving.
What is the hope of Christmas? Living.
What is the joy of Christmas? Love.
No silver or gold is needed for giving,
If the heart is filled with Christmas love,
For the hope of the world is kindly living,
Learned from the joy of God above.—Laura Hooker


Still No Room

Because there was no room for them in the inn (Luke 2:7). Not long ago a professor of psychology in one of our great universities gave a word-suggestion test to his class of forty students. He instructed them to write the word "Christmas," and all the class did so. "Now," said the professor, "write after the word `Christmas' the first thought that flashes through your mind regarding that day." When the papers were turned in, such answers were given as "tree." "holly," "mistletoe," "presents," "turkey," "holiday," "carols," and "Santa Claus," but not one had written, "the birthday of Jesus."—War Cry.


"Unto You Is Born This Day—"

O what a Day!
Foretold in ages long since past;
By many Prophets oft forecast;
God's promises the world outlast—
O what a Day!

O what a Gift!
From God the Father up in Heav'n,
To sinful mortals Satan driv'n,
A Saviour, Christ the Lord, was g'iv'n—
O what a Gift!

O what a Babe!
A Child asleep on Mary's knee,
Yet true incarnate God was He,
With "goings forth" eternally—
O what a Babe!

O what a Love!
Born purposely for men to die,
To save them, bless, and glorify,
And bear them, to His Home on high—
Owhat a Love!

What shall we Do?
E'er this glad Christmastide is gone,
Accept Him now, and love Him on,
His soulful praises e'er prolong—
This let us do.—R. E. Neighbour, D.D.


Still No Room

Because there was no room for them in the inn (Luke 2:7). Not long ago a professor of psychology in one of our great universities gave a word-suggestion test to his class of forty students. He instructed them to write the word "Christmas," and all the class did so. "Now," said the professor, "write after the word `Christmas' the first thought that flashes through your mind regarding that day." When the papers were turned in, such answers were given as "tree." "holly," "mistletoe," "presents," "turkey," "holiday," "carols," and "Santa Claus," but not one had written, "the birthday of Jesus."—War Cry.


That glorious Form, that Light unsufferable,
And that far-beaming blaze of Majesty
Wherewith He wont at Heaven's high council-table
To sit the midst of Trinal unity,
He laid aside; and here with us to be,
Forsook the courts of everlasting day
And chose with us a darksome house of mortal clay.—John Milton, Ode on the morning of Christ's nativity

(John 1. 14; Gal. 4. 4-5; 1 Tim. 1. 15)


Christmas. E. C. Adams, missionary in Chagallu, West Godavari District, India, told of a loved and respected Indian brother, long with the Lord, who years ago was asked to give a Christmas message to the assembled congregation. It was a message not to be readily forgotten. He spoke of the preparations that were made by many to observe the day—the decorations to the houses, the coloured paper streamers, the plants and flowers on the verandahs and tables of their homes, the presents given by one to another, the homecoming of members of the family who had been long absent, the invitations sent out to friends to share in the rejoicings, the abundance of food and dainties eaten with such relish, the jovial singing and the happy talk that made the day one long to be remembered. But, said he, in the midst of all such delights, how many thought of Him in Whose honor the day was being observed? Many would be sated with feasting, and some would be drunken; but what place would the Lord have in it all? What place has He in our hearts?

Then breaking off, the speaker sang a verse of a Telugu hump written by a saint of God whose songs have enriched the hymnology of the Church. The verse might thus be rendered in English:

What would Heaven be without Him?
For Him alone my heart would pine:
If here and now I know Him with me,
Untold joy and Heaven are mine.

(Isa. 9. 6; Matt 2. 1, 2; Luke 2. 10, 11; 2 Tim. 2. 8)

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